timemagazine
timemagazine:

News is never a 9 to 5 job. 
Wednesday evening, with the news that Apple visionary Steve Jobs had passed away from pancreatic cancer, TIME managing editor Rick Stengel (center) decided to stop the presses on the issue the staff had just finished earlier that afternoon. Staff members poured back into the TIME offices for an emergency edit meeting, which left us just over three hours to produce a new issue, many of us working on the very Apple devices that Jobs created.
Thursday, we’ll announce our latest issue featuring Jobs on the cover for the eighth time. 

timemagazine:

News is never a 9 to 5 job. 

Wednesday evening, with the news that Apple visionary Steve Jobs had passed away from pancreatic cancer, TIME managing editor Rick Stengel (center) decided to stop the presses on the issue the staff had just finished earlier that afternoon. Staff members poured back into the TIME offices for an emergency edit meeting, which left us just over three hours to produce a new issue, many of us working on the very Apple devices that Jobs created.

Thursday, we’ll announce our latest issue featuring Jobs on the cover for the eighth time. 

We were at an NYC tech party when Steve Jobs died. Strange, seminal moment

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It’s a sad, somber day for us here at CNNMoney Tech as we continue our coverage of Steve Jobs’ death at age 56.

Last night was a strange experience, as Laurie and I were at a Business Insider party celebrating 100 of the top techies when we found out.

Our night began oddly, as the event was on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange — which was barricaded amid the Occupy Wall Street protest that I’ve been covering. After much pleading with police officers and digging up our e-mail invitations, we were finally allowed behind the barrier.

We’d been at the party only a few minutes and I was chatting with some friends — when suddenly Laurie came running up to me and shoved her iPhone in my hand. I read the email, we exchanged openmouthed looks and wordlessly we ran to a back room to make calls to our colleagues.

Stacy asked us to gather reactions from some of the New York tech leaders who were milling about. By this point, the tickers on the NYSE floor were flashing the news. I could feel the shift in the room.

It’s never an easy task to ask people to discuss the death of an icon just after it happens. But several people agreed, and I jotted down my notes on a used cocktail napkin as I sped around the room. I tapped out the notes on my BlackBerry, still in a daze, and Dave compiled a bunch of reactions into a story we posted right away.

When I finally looked up and took a breath, I realized the room was emptying out. After all, a lot of the people in attendance were also tech reporters; they had to get to work on the difficult task of attempting to put Steve Jobs’ legacy into words.

I, too, left soon after that. I don’t think anyone felt quite right about being at a party after hearing the news. But a friend-of-a-friend tech entrepreneur said something that made me glad for the strange circumstances.

"You know, in most cases we’d all be at home on our couches learning about this from Twitter," he said. "At least this way we were here together, talking and remembering him."

I won’t attempt to wax poetic here; I’ve nothing to say that hasn’t already been said. But I know I’ll never forget exactly where I was at the moment I learned Steve Jobs died. -Julianne

Mark Zuckerberg has spent many hours studying Steve Jobs’ presentations. Right down to repeating exactly what the features are. “All your stories, all your apps, in a new way to express who you are…all your stories, all your apps, in a new way to express who you are.”

An open letter to my boss, Steve Jobs

Dear Steve,

I’m writing to let you know that I’m leaving Apple. It wasn’t an easy decision, but it appears that readers have found out that you’re paying me to write positive articles about your company. I can’t hide it anymore. It’s not good for my credibility.

I mean, how could people not realize that I’m in your pocket when I write articles about how you set records in share price, iPhone sales, iPad sales, revenue and profit? You couldn’t possibly set all those records at once! I can’t believe you even suggested that. That idea was dumber than the Newton.

When I first brought up the possibility that people were on to us, you suggested I throw in a few unfavorable articles, just for show. Well, even though I wrote stories with the titles, “Mobile Web apps escape Apple’s iron grip,” “Taking down the Apple and Google smartphone duopoly" and "What’s the bug up Apple’s @$$?,” none of those articles threw them off.

Not even my story criticizing Apple’s decision to pull the Xserve without warning, or the fact that I said the move was indicative of your losing strategy in the enterprise space, could do anything to assuage their fears that I was cashing Apple checks. 

You thought by saying Apple’s surpassing of Microsoft in tech market share was overstated might disguise the fact that you hired me. Nope. Saying Apple is a new hacker bulls-eye? Uh-uh. Calling you out for a bogus answer to iPhone 4 antenna problems? No way. Calling iPhone problems “an annual tradition?” No sir. Expressing concern about Apple’s supply constraints? No.

So I think it’s best to part ways. I’ll miss those big fat checks rolling in.

But it’s cool. Google has made me an offer I can’t refuse. 

Best,

David

Overthinking Apple’s WWDC announcement

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Source: Apple

Two possible reasons why Apple took the unusual step of pre-announcing what would be discussed at its WWDC event on Monday:

1) Apple wanted to let people know ahead of time that Apple would not be announcing the iPhone 5, so no one would be disappointed.

2) Apple wanted to make people believe that the iPhone 5 would not be discussed, only to save it for a truly surprising ”one more thing…” from Steve Jobs.

Hmmm… -David