Image: CNNMoney 
Magazines prep multiple cover mock-ups for each issue, leaving them with stacks of covers that never were. (One of Bloomberg BusinessWeek’s recent discards made a rare public showing this week.)
We knew Apple’s latest quarter was likely to be a showstopper, so we kicked a few ideas around with CNNMoney’s graphics team ahead of the release. Above is the image we’d planned to use, showing Apple’s giant spike in iPhone sales.Then the release landed, and the story shifted from “major iPhone sales” to “major everything sales.” Apple’s $46 billion is a tech industry record. So our story went with a different image, showing Apple’s year-over-year leaps in sales and profits.But here’s the iPhone chart anyway — because that image is also pretty astonishing. -Stacy

Image: CNNMoney 

Magazines prep multiple cover mock-ups for each issue, leaving them with stacks of covers that never were. (One of Bloomberg BusinessWeek’s recent discards made a rare public showing this week.)

We knew Apple’s latest quarter was likely to be a showstopper, so we kicked a few ideas around with CNNMoney’s graphics team ahead of the release. Above is the image we’d planned to use, showing Apple’s giant spike in iPhone sales.

Then the release landed, and the story shifted from “major iPhone sales” to “major everything sales.” Apple’s $46 billion is a tech industry record. So our story went with a different image, showing Apple’s year-over-year leaps in sales and profits.

But here’s the iPhone chart anyway — because that image is also pretty astonishing. -Stacy

A Google lover’s introduction to the iPhone

image

Despite the fact that my entire life is stored in Google products, I now have an iPhone. I was tired of my buggy Android device, and I wanted a smartphone that just did what I wanted it to do without the force quits, task management and assorted oddities that come with an Android smartphone.

What I got was a beautiful, much more powerful device that does a whole lot of things that make me say, “Wow, that’s really smart.” I was a little nervous about the switch, but I have to say that I’m generally very pleased.

The problem that I have with my iPhone actually has little to do with Apple. I’m not sure why I can’t subscribe to podcasts on iTunes, and I swear I didn’t have a battery problem until I downloaded the so-called “battery problem fix.” But really, it’s Google that’s got me wondering, “What gives?”

For a company that claims to live and breathe open-source technologies, they really shafted iPhone users. Compared to the truly stellar Android version, Google Maps on the iPhone is a total joke. There’s no Gmail app (well, there was, but it didn’t work). The Google Voice app looks and functions like it was designed by someone who just didn’t care. And there’s no Google Talk app.

Maybe I’m too cynical, but I’ve noticed that the Google search, Google+ and Google Places apps work beautifully — all the apps that either contribute to the company’s revenue or generate content for its ecosystem. In a sense, Google appears to be delivering the exact opposite message to its users than the “open” message it purports to live by.

If it really is Google’s plan to make Android a more attractive option than its competitor, it’s a puzzling one. True, Apple and Google are in a heated battle over a fast-growing mobile space, but I sincerely doubt that holding back on key features in Maps, Google Voice and other apps are influencing too many smartphone buyers’ decisions about whether to get an iPhone or and Android device.

There are some clever developers that have helped me get around Google’s annoying attitude towards its mobile competitor. Waze is a fantastic navigation app that employs the same user-generated data method that Google Maps for Android does. An app called Vtok is a great Google Talk app.

I don’t expect Google to bend over backwards for non-Android users. But it can do a much better job of living up to its motto. -David

timemagazine
timemagazine:

News is never a 9 to 5 job. 
Wednesday evening, with the news that Apple visionary Steve Jobs had passed away from pancreatic cancer, TIME managing editor Rick Stengel (center) decided to stop the presses on the issue the staff had just finished earlier that afternoon. Staff members poured back into the TIME offices for an emergency edit meeting, which left us just over three hours to produce a new issue, many of us working on the very Apple devices that Jobs created.
Thursday, we’ll announce our latest issue featuring Jobs on the cover for the eighth time. 

timemagazine:

News is never a 9 to 5 job. 

Wednesday evening, with the news that Apple visionary Steve Jobs had passed away from pancreatic cancer, TIME managing editor Rick Stengel (center) decided to stop the presses on the issue the staff had just finished earlier that afternoon. Staff members poured back into the TIME offices for an emergency edit meeting, which left us just over three hours to produce a new issue, many of us working on the very Apple devices that Jobs created.

Thursday, we’ll announce our latest issue featuring Jobs on the cover for the eighth time.